Thursday, September 3, 2009

Consumer Whore

I just experienced this phone call and I think it portrays a mindset that I'd like to make a public example of.
~beep~

Me- "This is David with Charter Communications, how may I help you?"
Her- "I'd like to add DVR to my service."

~insert probing questions and up-selling attempts here~

Me- "Well, in that case, you have some options... You can do a free self-installation if you pick up the equipment yourself or I can send a tech out to install it for $29.99."
Her-"Well, I don't really want to do a self-install, but I don't want to pay for it either."

~moment of silence~

Me- "So which one do you want?"
Her- "Well, can't you just have someone bring it out?"
Me- "Yes, I can. For just a one time charge of $29.99."
Her- In a very perplexed voice, "Well, can't you just waive that?"
Me- "No, I can't."
Her- "Well, can I speak to your supervisor?"
Me- "No. We're the sales office, we don't wave charges. If you want to speak with customer service, I'll give you their number."

~gave number for customer service~
I bet this lady voted for Obama. It's okay to ask for deals, but there really is a limit. There's a difference between asking for a break and expecting a handout.
I wanted to ask her why I should wave the installation charge. Why? What is the reason? Should this technician not get paid for his time taken to get the DVR Box and drive out to this persons house and spend about half an hour there or possibly more installing this DVR? If this process takes one hour from the time the technician obtains the DVR until he gets back to the office or onto his next job then this technician got paid $15/hr and that is only if 100% of this installation charge went to the tech. Should this technician do this as a volunteer service to this customer out of the goodness of his heart? Does the goodness of his heart feed his family? No.

*Read my political analysys of this situation here*.